mythologyrules:

In Hindu mythology and religion, Vishnu is one of the three most important gods (the others being Brahma and Shiva).





He is the Lord of Satoguna (the virtues of the truth). Vishnu is also the Preserver or Sustainer of life with his steadfast principles of order, righteousness, and truth. When these values are under threat, Vishnu emerges out of his transcendence to restore peace and order on earth.

Vishnu has four arms to indicate his all-powerful and omnipresent nature. His physical existence is represented by the two arms in the front, while the two arms at the back represent his presence in the spiritual world.A crown adorns Vishnu’s head which symbolizes his supreme authority.

Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, beauty, and prosperity, is Vishnu’s consort.

mythologyrules:

In Hindu mythology and religion, Vishnu is one of the three most important gods (the others being Brahma and Shiva).

He is the Lord of Satoguna (the virtues of the truth). Vishnu is also the Preserver or Sustainer of life with his steadfast principles of order, righteousness, and truth. When these values are under threat, Vishnu emerges out of his transcendence to restore peace and order on earth.
Vishnu has four arms to indicate his all-powerful and omnipresent nature. His physical existence is represented by the two arms in the front, while the two arms at the back represent his presence in the spiritual world.
A crown adorns Vishnu’s head which symbolizes his supreme authority.
Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, beauty, and prosperity, is Vishnu’s consort.

Hanumān (Anjaneya)
Son of Anjana and Vāyu, also known as Hanumantha. Anjana was the wife of Kesari, a noble monkey who after several years of married life decided to go into solitude; and asked Anjana to pray to Vāyu. Anjana did that and one day Vāyu appeared before An-jana and gave her Shiva’s sperm which he was carrying and out of that Anjana gave birth to Anjaneya. Anjaneya mistook the Sun for a fruit and wanted to eat it, but Rahu intervened. Then Anjaneya wanted to eat Rahu who fled to Indra and told of the boy’s strength. Indra came to punish the boy on his elephant, Airavata. Anjaneya jumped on the elephant and Indra struck him with Vajra and that hit him on the hanus (cheek bones) and Anjaneya fainted. The name Hanumān comes from this incident. Vāyu saw this and was angry with Indra and removed himself from the world. The world had no air and complained to Brahma. Brahma saw what has happened and praised Vāyu. Vāyu returned with his son Anjaneya and all the Devas gave him lots of boons.

Hanumān wanted to learn from the Sun and asked the Sun to teach him. When Sun said he was always moving, he stood occupying east and west. Sun admired his strength and taught him. Hanumān was a scholar in music also. He became chief of staff to Sugrīva who was banished by Vāli. When Rāma was searching for his wife Sīta, Hanuman met him and took him to Sugrīva. Sugrīva said if Rāma could kill his brother Vāli and restore his kingdom of Kishkindha to him, he would help him find Sīta. From that meeting on, Hanumān was a faithful servant of Rāma. Rāma killed Vāli and Sugrīva sent troops in all directions to search of Sīta. Rāma knew from the beginning that Hanumān would be the one to find Sīta, so he gave his wedding band to Hanumān as proof for Sīta. They searched and searched but couldn’t find even a trace of her when Sampāti (a vulture) told them that Rāvana kidnapped her and took her to Lanka.
(To read more, you can purchase Dr K. Sarma’s book on iTunes and Kindle!)

Hanumān (Anjaneya)

Son of Anjana and Vāyu, also known as Hanumantha. Anjana was the wife of Kesari, a noble monkey who after several years of married life decided to go into solitude; and asked Anjana to pray to Vāyu. Anjana did that and one day Vāyu appeared before An-jana and gave her Shiva’s sperm which he was carrying and out of that Anjana gave birth to Anjaneya. Anjaneya mistook the Sun for a fruit and wanted to eat it, but Rahu intervened. Then Anjaneya wanted to eat Rahu who fled to Indra and told of the boy’s strength. Indra came to punish the boy on his elephant, Airavata. Anjaneya jumped on the elephant and Indra struck him with Vajra and that hit him on the hanus (cheek bones) and Anjaneya fainted. The name Hanumān comes from this incident. Vāyu saw this and was angry with Indra and removed himself from the world. The world had no air and complained to Brahma. Brahma saw what has happened and praised Vāyu. Vāyu returned with his son Anjaneya and all the Devas gave him lots of boons.

Hanumān wanted to learn from the Sun and asked the Sun to teach him. When Sun said he was always moving, he stood occupying east and west. Sun admired his strength and taught him. Hanumān was a scholar in music also. He became chief of staff to Sugrīva who was banished by Vāli. When Rāma was searching for his wife Sīta, Hanuman met him and took him to Sugrīva. Sugrīva said if Rāma could kill his brother Vāli and restore his kingdom of Kishkindha to him, he would help him find Sīta. From that meeting on, Hanumān was a faithful servant of Rāma. Rāma killed Vāli and Sugrīva sent troops in all directions to search of Sīta. Rāma knew from the beginning that Hanumān would be the one to find Sīta, so he gave his wedding band to Hanumān as proof for Sīta. They searched and searched but couldn’t find even a trace of her when Sampāti (a vulture) told them that Rāvana kidnapped her and took her to Lanka.

(To read more, you can purchase Dr K. Sarma’s book on iTunes and Kindle!)

posted 10 months ago with 10 notes

See link for more information on this deity

See link for more information on this deity

posted 10 months ago with 6 notes

Arjuna is the third of the Pandavas, the sons and princes of Pandu, who with Krishna, is considered to be the hero of the Hindu epic Mahabharata

Arjuna is the third of the Pandavas, the sons and princes of Pandu, who with Krishna, is considered to be the hero of the Hindu epic Mahabharata

posted 10 months ago with 13 notes

krishnaart:

♥♥ GOPAL KRISHNA ♥♥ Artist: Dhruva Maharaja dasahttp://www.krishnalilas.com/ “As young Krishna plays his flute in the moonlight on the bank of the Yamuna river, the peacocks dance, a cow licks his feet and the trees bloom with fragrant flowers.”~Krishna book

krishnaart:

♥♥ GOPAL KRISHNA ♥♥
Artist: Dhruva Maharaja dasa
http://www.krishnalilas.com/

“As young Krishna plays his flute in the moonlight on the bank of the Yamuna river, the peacocks dance, a cow licks his feet and the trees bloom with fragrant flowers.”~Krishna book



julian-colgan:

The Mystical Breathe Of God.

julian-colgan:

The Mystical Breathe Of God.


igotfigs:

. The very word govinda, which is a famous name of Lord Krishna, means “one who brings satisfaction to the cows”. And Lord Krishna has many such transcendental names which reflect His relationship to the cows. Gopala means “the protector of the cows”, and Krishna is famous throughout India as bala-gopala, “the child who protects the cows”.

igotfigs:

. The very word govinda, which is a famous name of Lord Krishna, means “one who brings satisfaction to the cows”. And Lord Krishna has many such transcendental names which reflect His relationship to the cows. Gopala means “the protector of the cows”, and Krishna is famous throughout India as bala-gopala, “the child who protects the cows”.



zenjamaican:

Kālī (Sanskrit: काली, IPA: [kɑːliː]), also known as Kālikā (Sanskrit: कालिका), is the Hindu goddess associated with empowerment, shakti. The name Kali comes from kāla, which means black, time, death, lord of death, Shiva. Since Shiva is called Kāla—the eternal time—Kālī, his consort, also means “Time” or “Death” (as in time has come). Hence, Kāli is the Goddess of Time and Change. Although sometimes presented as dark and violent, her earliest incarnation as a figure of annihilator of evil forces still has some influence. Various Shakta Hindu cosmologies, as well as Shākta Tantric beliefs, worship her as the ultimate reality or Brahman. She is also revered as Bhavatārini (literally “redeemer of the universe”). Comparatively recent devotional movements largely conceive Kāli as a benevolent mother goddess.[1]
Kālī is represented as the consort of Lord Shiva, on whose body she is often seen standing. Shiva laid in path of Kali, whose foot on Shiva subdues her anger. She is time manifestation of other Hindu goddesses like Durga, Bhadrakali, Sati, Rudrani, Parvati and Chamunda. She is the foremost among the Dasa Mahavidyas, ten fierce Tantric goddesses.[2]

zenjamaican:

Kālī (SanskritकालीIPA: [kɑːliː]), also known as Kālikā (Sanskritकालिका), is the Hindu goddess associated with empowerment, shakti. The name Kali comes from kāla, which means black, time, death, lord of death, Shiva. Since Shiva is called Kāla—the eternal time—Kālī, his consort, also means “Time” or “Death” (as in time has come). Hence, Kāli is the Goddess of Time and Change. Although sometimes presented as dark and violent, her earliest incarnation as a figure of annihilator of evil forces still has some influence. Various Shakta Hindu cosmologies, as well as Shākta Tantric beliefs, worship her as the ultimate reality or Brahman. She is also revered as Bhavatārini (literally “redeemer of the universe”). Comparatively recent devotional movements largely conceive Kāli as a benevolent mother goddess.[1]

Kālī is represented as the consort of Lord Shiva, on whose body she is often seen standing. Shiva laid in path of Kali, whose foot on Shiva subdues her anger. She is time manifestation of other Hindu goddesses like DurgaBhadrakaliSatiRudraniParvati and Chamunda. She is the foremost among the Dasa Mahavidyas, ten fierce Tantric goddesses.[2]